nanonaturalist: nanonaturalist: nanonaturali…

nanonaturalist:

nanonaturalist:

nanonaturalist:

worm-suggestion:

Photogenic… Charming little fellows, to be sure…

Now that I checked scorpionfly off my wishlist, next step: SNAKEFLY!

October 12, 2018

@quickwitter I don’t know about the bugs of Costa Rica (yet!), but Dobsonflies and snakeflies are a bit different

Snakeflies are tiny, with a long skinny neck

Dobsonflies:

These are LARGE!! They do look similar in many respects. Dobsonflies are in order Megaloptera with fishflies, and I think those can look closer to snakeflies.

All around, I would highly recommend both 😂

October 12, 2018

@bowelfly You are right about it being “a California thing,” for the most part. Snakeflies do show up in Texas, but very rarely based on reports on iNaturalist and bugguide.

Snakeflies mostly occur west of the Rockies. One more reason to shake my fist at my past self for not going bughunting when I lived in Seattle.

To be fair, Texas gets a good number of things that are rare or do not occur elsewhere in the US. For example, I scratched my head when I saw a post of somebody getting very excited to see their first webspinner, while they’re so common here that I often find them in my house.

This may also be a case of them being small and “boring,” and are overlooked easily. A shame, they’re great!

October 13, 2018

@etosaurus It’s possible! They are tiny and skinny, and hold their wings flat against their backs. Their front forearms are thick, as that is where their silk glands are.

They are small and hard to photograph well, but here are a couple I’ve seem at my house.

I believe they are social and live in groups in their web-homes under fallen wood. I have never seen them in their webs, though.

October 13, 2018