Category: birds

Regular

Dressing Appropriately for Networking Events

Or

My Time Has Come

Uh oh. Is this a costume contest? Is there… prize??? I must have… all the prize.

I have alerted them. They know to prepare themselves. But for what, they have no idea.

Behold, my wardrobe for a networking event next week. Taking inspiration from one of nature’s most elegant *cough* creatures

Photo credit: Melvin Jaison on ebird [link]

I bring to you:

The flamingo: is a hat. The body sits atop my head. It was a clearance Halloween item I purchased for $2 because… I mean, $2!

Anyways. Hopefully the flamingo hat will work magic because… uh yeah my unemployment benefits run out in a couple weeks, things are looking scary my friends 😞

August 22, 2019

Regular

batcoins:

nanonaturalist:

nanonaturalist:

bogleech:

Almost all of human culture throughout history seems to regard birds and beautiful, majestic, respectable animals but have you actually met a bird??? Have you ever seen anything resembling dignity come out of those things???

Pictured above: Dignity escaping from birds in liquid form
Spotted Sandpiper, Texas (top) and Common Bulbul, Malawi (bottom)

August 13, 2019

@jabercoll, my friend, you forget the part where birds often poop… nonchalantly… on each other.

These Black Vultures?

They’re called Black Vultures for a reason. They are purely black. They have no white feathers.

Their poop, however, is white. They are highly social birds, they roost in large groups. And like birds are wont to do, they nonchalantly poop wherever they happen to be. Which is often directly above another bird. 

August 13, 2019

Birds don’t have a rectum and thus can’t store their feces, so they don’t have a choice!

This blog is pro-cloaca

No cloca-shaming was present in my previous post! However, their ROOSTING BEHAVIORS *cough*

Black Vultures are still one of my absolute favorite birds ever, and they are perfect in every way, even down to their cookies-and-cream feathers

Regular

nanonaturalist:

bogleech:

Almost all of human culture throughout history seems to regard birds and beautiful, majestic, respectable animals but have you actually met a bird??? Have you ever seen anything resembling dignity come out of those things???

Pictured above: Dignity escaping from birds in liquid form
Spotted Sandpiper, Texas (top) and Common Bulbul, Malawi (bottom)

August 13, 2019

@jabercoll, my friend, you forget the part where birds often poop… nonchalantly… on each other.

These Black Vultures?

They’re called Black Vultures for a reason. They are purely black. They have no white feathers.

Their poop, however, is white. They are highly social birds, they roost in large groups. And like birds are wont to do, they nonchalantly poop wherever they happen to be. Which is often directly above another bird. 

August 13, 2019

Regular

bogleech:

Almost all of human culture throughout history seems to regard birds and beautiful, majestic, respectable animals but have you actually met a bird??? Have you ever seen anything resembling dignity come out of those things???

Pictured above: Dignity escaping from birds in liquid form
Spotted Sandpiper, Texas (top) and Common Bulbul, Malawi (bottom)

August 13, 2019

Florida Master Naturalist Program

Florida Master Naturalist Program:

pterygota:

hey hey can you all do me a favor and like this photo for a photo contest i entered??? thank you!!

Look at this superb owl!

July 22, 2019

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:We can’t always see the …

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

We can’t always see the flows around us, but that doesn’t mean they’re not there. Audobon Photography Award winner Kathrin Swaboda waited for a cold morning to catch this spectacular photo of a red-winged blackbird’s song. In the morning chill, moisture from the bird’s breath condensed inside the vortex rings it emitted, giving us a glimpse of its sound. (Image credit: K. Swaboda; via Gizmodo; submitted by Joseph S and Stuart H)

*faints*

Now that’s what I call nature photography

July 19, 2019

nanonaturalist: Feb 19, 2017, Hornsby Bend Bir…

nanonaturalist:

Feb 19, 2017, Hornsby Bend Bird Observatory, Austin TX 

Birds?! At a BIRD observatory?! This was my first Official Bird Watching Trip, which I did to participate in the Great Backyard Bird Count [link]. I had bought a monocular and a special cell phone mount that allowed me to take photos through it without needing a super fancy camera. Birding is a lot harder than I thought–so many times I just barely got a glimpse of something and never had the chance to even get the camera out. 

Of course I got distracted by bugs starting out, but oh man, almost all of these birds were ones I have *never* seen before. 

Pictured above: 
Northern shoveler duck. There was a huge flock of several hundred on the water
American coots

Left: eared grebe (winter plumage); Right: ruddy duck (male)

Savannah sparrows

Lesser scaups

The eared grebes were hard to get–they are a diving bird and typically by the time I had them in my sight they were already diving back down. Took over 20 photos that looked like the Loch Ness Monster before getting the clearest shot allowing me to ID them.

Funny how time flies

2017: First time birding
2019: Published author/photographer in Audubon Magazine

Seriously, it’s going to take me a while to get over this. Maybe by the time my second article publishes!

Also, this is what two years of obsessing over a hobby can get you! Reminder, when Audubon was looking for neurodivergent birders for their piece on accessible birding, and they needed writing samples, I used some posts from this blog as my samples!!! If you are interested in being a science writer, but you can’t get pieces published until… you get pieces published… publish your own work! Blogs are legitimate these days! Feel free to ask me for tips if you need help getting started!

Reposted July 9, 2019

nanofishology: I’m in lab, about to Do Science…

nanofishology:

I’m in lab, about to Do Science, and one of my labmates runs into the lab looking for me. He had rescued a baby bird and had no idea what to do with it. He found it in a parking lot and didn’t want the baby to get run over. So I had him walk me to where he found the bird (a fledgeling blue jay, I think) and we put the sweet baby under a nearby tree.

So that was my adventure for the day.

Another blast from the past (aka 2015). 

Reposted July 6, 2019

nanofishology:Walking to the bus stop on campu…

nanofishology:

Walking to the bus stop on campus, I hear a racket and bunch of birds in the tree above me freaking out. I thought a branch had fallen based in the noise. I shrug and keep walking. Then I hear a hawk call and look up–a hawk had grabbed a bird out of the tree and flown to another. I stood under the tree and watched. Feathers were falling like snow.

This happened sometime in 2015. Of course, nobody else noticed. This was on campus at University of Texas at Austin. A Red-Tailed Hawk unwraps dinner.

reposted July 6, 2019

theraptorcage:Great Horned Owl’s broad, but sh…

theraptorcage:

Great Horned Owl’s broad, but short wings make them surprisingly maneuverable during flight. 

:O

June 30, 2019