Category: insects

Regular

six-legs-and-more:

the-study-of-arachnology-comic:

six-legs-and-more:

nanonaturalist:

six-legs-and-more:

six-legs-and-more:

entomologyfrassposting:

six-legs-and-more:

six-legs-and-more:

I just found what I think is a dying great diving beetle in the middle of campus for some reason so I brought it back to my dorm and stuck it in my freezer

I’m gonna try to pin it but I have never pinned an insect before so this is not going to be pretty 

but I gotta learn somehow 

Yeah broke sound about right I just tore apart an old slipper for the foam sole

This is gonna be great

Pinning is the best! Here’s the best spot to pin a beetle in just in case you didn’t know. A little tip I wish I knew when doing beetles, especially large ones, be careful where you pin in relation to the oegs because you could accidentally take a leg off when the pin goes through

Thank you so much you all are saving my life. As a little update the beetle, besides a bit of guts coming out from the bottom of it, was in pretty good condition: wings and legs and head nicely intact. I put it in a cutout bottom of a plastic cup legs down but now the beetle is frozen to the bottom of the cup by its guts. Marvel at my professional 12am handiwork. I should have froze it upside down. Ahh the things we learn through trial and error.

I’ll have a look. I can already hear the distant screams of those who have done this for years as I eventually subject them to watching me destroy this poor bug.

This site (Purdue Entomology [link]) has some great info and tips for pinning and displaying all sorts of insects (use the table of contents over to the left of the page to navigate). When you start pinning with labels, there is a special pinning block with various heights that allows you to have the labels all exactly the right distance apart so you can read all the info from the drawer.

April 8, 2019

You know I’ve been joking around a lot but I really do mean it when I say that the bug side of tumblr is my favorite part of tumblr. Everyone has been so helpful, maybe it won’t turn out as bad as I think. Thank you!!!

Now im kinda curious…. could you pin a weevil or are thwy simply too small?

According to that site @nanonaturalist gave above, you can pin small insects, but you have to attach them to a card and then pin the card

ANOTHER ALTERNATIVE! You can buy those empty pill capsules, put your small insect in them, and then pin through the capsule. Bioquip sells the caps [link], but you can also buy them from the pharmacy for pretty cheap. 

I use them to store my tiny caterpillar head capsules (when I don’t have them just laying around in a jar lid somewhere ugh).

If you use these things, make sure YOU DON’T GET THEM WET!!!!!! (they dissolve!!)

April 18, 2019

Do you ever pin any of your bugs after they di…

Do you ever pin any of your bugs after they die? Like to use to educate people? Or is it too emotional for you after their passing?

I try to pin and frame as many as I’m able! It’s part of continuing to enjoy such short lived buggos. It always sucks to lose insects you’ve worked so carefully raising and watching, no matter how long you’ve had them, but it happens 😢 (hell, it’s why most insects/spiders lay hundreds of eggs, stuff happens and that gives them a better survival chance). The two tarantulas here are Doc (P. cancerides) and Creamsicle (P. murinus). Doc was, unfortunately, a mature male, and Creamsicle had a bad molt.

Grog (D. tityus, beetle) and Anne (P. regalis) have been pinned for quite a while waiting on frames. Eastern Hercules Beetles dont live very long once maturing and Anne was a very old mature male pokie.

Sometimes, due to a bad molt (or my general ignorance for how to go about it with a particular critter), the bugs or spiders aren’t able to be pinned, but I still keep them in my sealed, padded display.

I also have friends who bring me dead insects/spiders, sometimes, too. Sometimes they’re a bit chewed on by clean up crews or fungi, so I disinfect them and place them in my frame for later.

If it’s in a postable format, I’d …

If it’s in a postable format, I’d love to see your list of species you’ve seen in your yard!

I keep track of my species on iNaturalist, so my species count is available for anybody to look at! And when I say “list,” I mean, photographs. Because I’m a scientist, and if it’s not verifiable, it doesn’t count 😉 The links below are organized by species, if you want to see my specific observations and photographs, click the little links for “# observations” above the organism’s name and it will take you to them.

The full, unfiltered “list” only shows the top 600 before it stops loading (by design), but here it is [link]

A tiny bit of background: This list covers 0.10 acres in east Travis County, Texas (my address says I’m in Austin, but I’m not, it’s a lie). My neighborhood is a housing development surrounded by agricultural land, and my house (and the development) was built starting around 15 years ago. My back yard is backed by a row of hackberry trees, and I have neighbors on either side. I bought this house in June 2016 and have been neglecting the back yard ever since, besides occasionally planting a few trees/bushes/bird feeders. I need to post some pictures of the yard over time because it’s starting to look like a legitimate forest. If I ever need to sell this place, oh boy.

The Spider Haven Species List – Numbers By Kingdom

Protozoans [link] 1 species (so far just Dog Vomit Slime Mold, but I have two other unidentified slime molds that don’t go into the numbers yet!)
Bacteria [link] 1 species (a plant disease–I need to get a microbio setup started for cultures bwahaha)
Fungi [link] 8 species (I’ve been slacking, I know I have more in my fridge ALONE right now)
Plants [link] 70 species (there’s more, I have photos from September 2018 I haven’t uploaded yet… ugh)
Animals [link] *cough* over 900 species… uh, I’ll need to break that down a bit…

Animals in my yard

Vertebrates [link] 72 species (birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians)
Annelids [link] 1 species (earthworms creep me out, sorry)
Mollusks [link] 10 species (missing my tiny little slugs!)
Flatworms [link] 2 species
Horsehair Worm [link] 1 species
Arthropods [link] 828 species. Okay….

ARTHROPODS

Crustaceans [link] 2 species (pillbugs!)
Myriapoda [link] 3 species
Arachnids [link] 75 species
Insects [link] 747 species. *SIGH*

I N S E C T S

Springtails [link]1 species (not easy to find!!!
Silverfishes [link]1 species
Cockroaches and Termites [link] 11 species
Butterflies and Moths [link] 279 species
Beetles [link]148 species
Earwigs [link] 2 species
Flies [link] 58 species
Webspinners [link] 1 species
Mayflies [link] 3 species
True Bugs & Allies [link] 124 species
Ants, Bees, Wasps, & Sawflies [link] 63 species
Mantids [link] 1 species, but I saw a mating pair and the male was missing a head [link]
Scorpionflies, Hangingflies, etc [link] 1 species 
Alderflies, Dobsonflies, Fishflies [link] 1 species
Antlions, Lacewings, Owlflies, Mantidflies [link] 4 species
Dragonflies and Damselflies [link] 23 species
Grasshoppers, Katydids, Crickets [link] 20 species
Stick insects [link] 3 species (but I think it should be 2, need to double check)
Stoneflies [link] 1 species
Barklice, booklice, and parasitic lice [link] 1 species
Thrips [link] 2 species
Caddisflies [link] 1 species (note: these are near-impossible to ID so I don’t really spend too much time on them)

They key take-aways appear to be: MÖTH, beetles, & true bugs. Not too much of a surprise, given I do a LOT of my snooping around the yard at night, and with my UV patio light on. Best $14 I ever spent! (I got it on sale, looks like it’s $20 now) [link]

Note: These species counts were accurate on the date I posted this list, April 12, 2019 at 12:47 am. The links will continue to work (oh please), but the numbers will change! They may go up as I add observations, or down as I my current observations are reclassified (happens ALL the time!).

April 12, 2019

On Insect Intelligence

People like me who spend a lot of time with insects tend to develop a bond with them. I get very attached to my caterpillars and the bugs in my yard, and watching their behavior sometimes makes you think there’s a brain in there.

And then… they do things like this:

This is a Variegated Fritillary butterfly. This is the first time I’ve ever seen one in my yard (I’m SO CLOSE TO 1,000 SPECIES!!!). She is laying eggs on the passion vine that is sprouting in my garden. I have a couple vines that have started up and are several feet long. Is she laying eggs on that one? No. She’s laying eggs on these. Repeatedly.

The Gulf Fritillary caterpillars I’ve raised can destroy an entire leaf in a few hours. *sigh* 

I guess when ya gotta go, ya gotta go.

She also laid eggs in the passion vine with the fire ant mound around it.

I pulled up this dinky little passion vine sprout and potted it. I’ll at least give these four little caterpillars a chance! Let’s see if I can grow this vine faster than they can eat it!

April 9, 2019

nanonaturalist: nanonaturalist: nanonaturali…

nanonaturalist:

nanonaturalist:

nanonaturalist:

Went to grab some quick food for the Cecropia caterpillars, and the leaflet I randomly picked to feed them had A BABY on it! I have no idea who this is, though with the hairs, I’m guessing a tiger moth of some sort?

Caterpillar season is HERE!!! I’ve got three species going now! Plus the stick insects. Let’s see how overboard I go this year (please not too much 😭). I am NOT planting more milkweed and it appears my plants from last year did not survive (*phew!*)

I love caterpillars but they are soul-draining vampires and I am compelled to serve them beyond my will. Save me.

March 27, 2019

Molting already

They grow so fast

March 29, 2019

Again and again!

Post-molt glamour shots from March 31 (so beautiful!). But of course, baby molted AGAIN two days later!!

Hmmmmm I have no idea who this could be 😉

Tiger moth of some sort, probably Virginian.

April 2, 2019

Catch-up time!

April 4

This sweet babe 😭 Growing so fast.

Oh! What’s this?

Molting? Again?!

April 6

A racing stripe! Some accent color! I think the babe is almost identifiable!

April 9

After another molt, we have some interesting changes!

Who could this baby be?!

My baby’s face is the same!

Can’t wait to see who this is!

April 8, 2019

Regular

six-legs-and-more:

six-legs-and-more:

entomologyfrassposting:

six-legs-and-more:

six-legs-and-more:

I just found what I think is a dying great diving beetle in the middle of campus for some reason so I brought it back to my dorm and stuck it in my freezer

I’m gonna try to pin it but I have never pinned an insect before so this is not going to be pretty 

but I gotta learn somehow 

Yeah broke sound about right I just tore apart an old slipper for the foam sole

This is gonna be great

Pinning is the best! Here’s the best spot to pin a beetle in just in case you didn’t know. A little tip I wish I knew when doing beetles, especially large ones, be careful where you pin in relation to the oegs because you could accidentally take a leg off when the pin goes through

Thank you so much you all are saving my life. As a little update the beetle, besides a bit of guts coming out from the bottom of it, was in pretty good condition: wings and legs and head nicely intact. I put it in a cutout bottom of a plastic cup legs down but now the beetle is frozen to the bottom of the cup by its guts. Marvel at my professional 12am handiwork. I should have froze it upside down. Ahh the things we learn through trial and error.

I’ll have a look. I can already hear the distant screams of those who have done this for years as I eventually subject them to watching me destroy this poor bug.

This site (Purdue Entomology [link]) has some great info and tips for pinning and displaying all sorts of insects (use the table of contents over to the left of the page to navigate). When you start pinning with labels, there is a special pinning block with various heights that allows you to have the labels all exactly the right distance apart so you can read all the info from the drawer.

April 8, 2019

Regular

pterygota:

oh man oh man this is bad

some people in my neighborhood have a passionvine and it often hosts gulf fritillaries and zebra longwings

just the other day my mom told me she saw tons of caterpillars on it

and today it smelled awful over there and theres dead and dying caterpillars all over the sidewalk, it looked like some were trying to evacuate. some were convulsing. there was stuff on the passionvine. i think they poisoned it. not only were all the caterpillars dying, but there were some ants convulsing from eating poisoned caterpillars. i cant feed them, so i was just trying to transfer all i could (including an egg i found) to these little vine sprouts in the grass away from the main plant, knowing full well its not enough to feed them but knowing its their only hope

i also took one of the vine sprouts that i found further away from where i was dumping the rescues and pulled it out since (and this is another terrible thing) that grass gets mowed and the sprouts get cut down

i rolled the root in rooting powder and put it in wet paper towels, does this sound good for getting the plant ready for transplant? im hoping i can eventually get my own passion vine growing, and we will never ever poison it, because its FOR THE BABIES DAMN IT!!!

any advice would be great, but thats mostly about the vine i took, im pretty sure all those caterpillars are a lost cause 🙁

So so so sorry, that’s horrible 🙁

Passion vine grows like a weed. The growth can be a little slow earlier in the season, but in Texas at least, by later spring the things are exploding with how fast they grow. Towards the end of the summer, the vines were practically invasive all over the back of my yard. I don’t know about transplanting it, but I recently pulled a root out of my garden and transplanted it into a hanging pot (no rooting powder because I don’t have any, I just water frequently). The paper towel sounds good, just make sure it doesn’t end up molding. If you water frequently, you might be find just putting it directly into a well-drained pot. I’ve had success doing this with random plants I’ve found throughout my yard when I replanted them in other locations. Just water frequently!

Gulf Fritillary butterflies are also EPIC egg-layers. They will be back. I don’t even know how they all found my passion vine, but they found it, and they covered it in eggs, and I had butterflies for a solid 9 months. I’m sorry you lost your early season babies, but there will be more. You’re right about those ones being a lost cause. The poisons will destroy their GI tract, so once they ingest it, that’s it. It’s too bad, they probably spray any wasp nests that pop up in their yard, too. I never had any caterpillars mature outside because the wasps took all the young caterpillars to feed their young, Why do humans keep messing things up?

April 8, 2019

Regular

theredshirtwholived:

systlin:

the-awkward-turt:

nanonaturalist:

starcults:

a-wandering-intern:

terrible-tentacle-theatre:

nanonaturalist:

thegreatpigeonking:

nanonaturalist:

nanonaturalist:

nanonaturalist:

alwayshere195:

fireheartedkaratepup:

thebeeblogger:

foxthebeekeeper:

jumpingjacktrash:

libertarirynn:

bollytolly:

l0veyu:

viva-la-bees:

fat-gold-fish:

how do u actually save bees?

  • Plant bee-friendly flowers
  • Support your local beekeepers
  • Set up bee hotels for solitary bees
  • If you see a lethargic bee feed it sugar water
  • Spread awareness of the importance off bees

+Don’t eat honey✌🏻

NO.

That will not help save the bees at all. They need the excess honey removed from their hives. That’s the beekeepers entire livelihood.

Seriously refusing to eat honey is one of those well-meaning but ultimately terrible ideas. The bees make way too much honey and need it out in order to thrive (not being funny but that was literally a side effect in Bee Movie). Plus that’s the only way for the beekeepers to make the money they need to keep the bees healthy. Do not stop eating honey because somebody on Tumblr told you too.

excess honey, if not removed, can ferment and poison the bees. even if it doesn’t, it attracts animals and other insects which can hurt the bees or even damage the hive. why vegans think letting bees stew in their own drippings is ‘cruelty-free’ is beyond me. >:[

the fact that we find honey yummy and nutritious is part of why we keep bees, true, but the truth is we mostly keep them to pollinate our crops. the vegetable crops you seem to imagine would still magically sustain us if we stopped cultivating bees.

and when you get right down to it… domestic bees aren’t confined in any way. if they wanted to fly away, they could, and would. they come back to the wood frame hives humans build because those are nice places to nest.

so pretending domestic bees have it worse than wild bees is just the most childish kind of anthropomorphizing.

If anything, man-made hives are MORE suitable for bees to live in because we have mathematically determined their optimal living space and conditions, and can control them better in our hives. We also can treat them for diseases and pests much easier than we could if they were living in, say, a tree.

Tl;dr for all of this: eating honey saves the bees from themselves, and keeping them in man-made hives is good for them.

✌️✌️✌️

Plus, buying honey supports bee owners, which helps them maintain the hives, and if they get more money they can buy more hives, which means more bees!

I tell people this. About the honey and what to do to save bees. I also have two large bottles of honey in my cabinet currently. Trying to get some flowers for them to thrive on. Support your bees guys

… uh guys… the whole “Save the Bees!” thing is not about honeybees. It’s about the decline of native bees almost to the point of extinction. Native bees do not make honey. Honeybees are domesticated. Taking measures to protect honeybees is as irrelevant to helping the environment as protecting Farmer John’s chickens.

To help save native bees, yes, plant NATIVE flowers (what naturally grows where you live? That’s what your bees eat!), set up “bee hotels,” which can be something as simple as a partially buried jar or flower pot for carpenter bees, and don’t use pesticides. Having a source of water (like a bird bath or “puddles” you frequently refresh) is also good for a variety of wildlife.

Want to know more about bees that are not honeybees?

Dark Bee Tumblr is here to help [link to post chain about forbidden bees]

ALSO also also

Every place has different types of bees. Every place has different types of plants/flowers. Those hyped-up “save the bees” seed packets that are distributed across North America are garbage because none of those flowers are native in every habitat. Don’t look up “how to make a bee hotel” and make something that only bees from the great plains areas would use if you live on the west coast.

Look up what bees you have in your home! Here’s a great (excellent) resource: https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/630955-Anthophila

This is every bee that has been observed and uploaded to the citizen science network of iNaturalist. You can filter by location (anywhere in the world! This is not restricted to the US!), and you can view photos of every species people have added. Here’s the page for all bees, sorted by taxonomy, not filtered to any specific location [link]. Have you seen a bee and want to know more about it, but you don’t know what kind of bee it is? Take a picture, upload it to iNat, and people like me will help you identify it–and it will also become part of the database other people will use to learn about nature!

Some native Texan bees I’ve met!

A sweat bee! [link to iNat]. These flowers are tiny, no larger than a dime.

A ligated furrow bee! [link to iNat] They burrow and nest underground.

A longhorn bee! [link to iNat] I don’t know where they nest, but I often find them sleeping on the tips of flowers at night (so cute!)

Meet your local bees! Befriend them! Feed them! Make them homes! Love them!

This is one of the native bees I met in Arizona! This handsome man is a male Melissodes sp., AKA a type of long-horned bee. I saved him when he was drowning in a puddle.

I love him

This is a great post all in all but I’d just like to note that colony collapse syndrome is definitely a thing, so domestic honeybees are absolutely in danger as well

Europen Honey Bees are an invasive species in the US and compete with native bees.

Native bee populations are specifically evolved to pollinate certain native plants. Most are unlikely to have a significant effect on the pollination of the non-native crops that people need to grow to survive. It’s true that honeybees will compete with native bees as well, and can be classified as an invasive species, but so long as native bees are supported and native flora is maintained, there is no reason why they shouldn’t be able to coexist. And while there’s a whole different argument to be had about the negative effects of growing nonnative crops at all, if they fail, as they likely would without the honeybees that a large percentage of farmers keep to pollinate their and other local crops, the effects on humanity will be catastrophic 

Lest people think I am anti-honeybee (no? I love honeybees?? They are precious??), the above is correct. Like it or not, the way we grow our food (much of which is not native to where it’s farmed) absolutely requires pollinators like honeybees. We would have a hugely massive food crisis on our hands without honeybees.

But, because so much $$$ is tied into the continued production of food, governments and food production companies will do whatever they can to mitigate the effects of colony collapse and other honeybee health issues. What can you do to help honeybees? Buy and eat food. Easy, right?

What is being done to protect native bees? Well,

1) Scientists and researchers are feverishly trying to get them listed as protected species and absolutely failing (see @thelepidopteragirl’s post about colleagues of hers: [link]).

2) Scientists and researchers are trying to get pesticides known to have devastating effects on bees and other pollinators banned and absolutely failing ([link]).

3) Scientists and science communicators (like me now, apparently) are trying to spread this information about native bees and their importance so more people can do little things like plant native flowers (lookup North American species for your zip code here: [link]), change how often they mow their lawns ([link]), and vote out the assholes who are profiting by destroying our environment ([link]). Success on this one: TBD, and by people like us.

As a gift to the honeybee lovers out there, please accept this photo of one making out with a stinkhorn mushroom:

^An excellent post on the complexities of the “Save the Bees” movement

To add, honeybees are also having problems in, you know, Europe and Asia, where they are native!

I feel like that gets forgotten by many, as Tumblr is very USA centered. 

@nanonaturalist don’t you mean bee-friend them?

*sigh* Please, allow me to introduce you to my roommate, Augochloropsis sp., a sweat bee (Austin, Texas):

Here is a close personal friend of mine, American Bumble Bee (Keller, Texas):

I traveled to Alberta last summer, and was able to meet up with an acquaintance, Cryptic Bumble Bee (Calgary, Alberta):

And the foreign exchange student staying with her, European Wool Carder Bee (Calgary, Alberta):

Flashback to the days before I dated my posts *shudders*
April 8, 2019

Regular

patchesthecryptid submitted:

I found a smol!

image

Little butterfly. No more than half an inch long. Found him in Las Vegas, NV. Teeny tiny friend.


Beautiful Gray Hairstreak butterfly [link to BugGuide]!

Here’s one I saw in Georgetown, TX last year:

I’ve also *cough* caught a couple of them in my yard at night

These are very small butterflies so you normally might not notice, but check out those noses!

This is the most common species of hairstreak butterfly in North America, and it is widespread from Canada to Mexico.

Regular

pterygota:

systlin:

witchyatwork:

systlin:

madamehearthwitch:

systlin:

systlin:

But seriously, when we got our property, it was all just…grass. A sterile grass moonscape, like a billion other yards. With two big old maple trees. Just grass and maples, that was it. 

But then I got my grubby little paws on it, and I immediately stopped fertilizing, spraying, and bagging up grass clippings and leaves. I ripped up sod and put in flowers and vegetables. I put down nice thick blankets of mulch around the flowers and vegetables. 

When I first was sweating my way through stripping sod, I saw a grand total of 1 worm and 0 ladybugs. The ground was compacted into something that would bend shovel blades. 

Now, six years later, I can’t dig a planting hole without turning up fourteen earthworms, and there are so many ladybugs here. Not the invasive asian lady beetles; native ladybugs. They winter over in the mulch and in the brush pile. I see thousands of them. 

The soil is soft and rich. There are birds that come to eat, and bees of many sorts.

Like this is something that you, yourself, can absolutely change. This is something that you, personally, can make a difference in.

Like, last year I watched no fewer than twenty-nine monarch caterpillars grow up on my milkweed and fly away as butterflies. I watched swallowtails and moths grow. There are hummingbirds fighting over flowers now.

I did that. Me. You can do the same.

I would like to learn how to do this. Sometimes it all seems so overwhelming. I just want to find someone who can come over for a cuppa, and we can wander the yard and they can make me a plan. 

Preferably a very easy to follow, doesn’t take too much time every day plan.

It’s not nearly so intimidating as it sounds.

You can do a whole lot of good just by not spraying your yard, not mowing it so often, and not raking up leaves and grass.

But as a certified Lazy Ass Gardener, I can tell you for 100% certain that this is attainable, and requires absolutely zero, none, nada, zilch expensive or complicated equipment.

I don’t even have a plan. I just do things.

Wait so, dont mow as much, dont pick up the grass when you mow, and dont pick up leaves and your grass is healthier? my dad likes to mow the lawn every one to 2 weeks in the summer💀 what other tips do you guys have?

Yup. Those grass and leaf clippings rot down and fertilize the soil.

Grass does BETTER when it’s not mown short, and gives more hiding places to all sorts of insects.

Don’t spray. Let the bugs and ‘weeds’ live.

i have a 10’x10’ piece of garden that i initially used to grow things, but i abandoned it completely and now its absolutely covered in “weeds” and i even have a volunteer shrub that makes berries! the amount of native bees and other insects i attract is incredible. and all i do to maintain it is nothing.

For reals. I have to mow my front yard (I live in an HOA… ugh), but I don’t bag my clippings. I never water my yard (and I live in Texas!), but my grass is green all year. The clippings and mulched leaves keep in moisture and they’re nature’s fertilizer! Lizards and frogs hide under the leaves and clippings, and when you remove those, you are removing their habitat. Bugs will show up and munch on the clippings, and their waste adds more nutrients as well. I don’t fertilize. I don’t spray. I let nature do its thing. Even just in the front, there are bugs everywhere. I’ve found the tiny green sweat bees nesting in the ground under my rose bush, and the giant cicada killer wasps had a nest somewhere in my front yard last year–I couldn’t find it, but they were pollinating the sorrelvine that randomly showed up and decided to climb up my oak tree (which was the host plant for the Vine Sphinx moths and the first batch of sawflies I raised!)

In the back? I planted a few things in a small garden area, and I intentionally planted three (3) trees, but I’m busy/lazy and the back yard became the paradise jungle it is when I was writing my Master’s thesis after moving into this house, and I never had the heart to start mowing it. A bunch more trees decided to start growing on their own and I constantly have to murder soapberry and hackberry and elm saplings. My yard is covered in a mix of native plants and invasive bunch grass, in addition to random grains and sunflowers growing under the bird feeders. They all serve as hosts for insects. 

In less than three years, I have documented almost 1000 species of plants, insects, birds, fungi, slime molds, and mammals. My yard is 0.10 acres. I have ladybugs crawling out of my ears. The larvae are pupating all over my horse skeleton!!!

So yeah. Want species diversity in your yard? Plant native plants. Are you a lazy ass like me and want species diversity? Then don’t do anything, congratulations, nature still wins (just look out for all those invasives, and have fun pulling out catchweed -_-)

April 5, 2019