Category: moths

marycapaldi: It’s MOTH WEEK – and I’m moving s…

marycapaldi:

It’s MOTH WEEK – and I’m moving soon – so that means it’s time for a sale!
✨🐛

Take 15% off shopwide with code “MOTHKING” only at MaryCapaldi.com/shop! Enamel pins, bandanas, art and poster prints, charms, stickers, and even more inspired by insects & animals all by one independent artist!

Shortly after the sale ends, the shop will close during my moving process, so get your goodies now or hold your peace until autumn! Thank you so much for your generous support not only in purchases but also in signal boosts and telling others about my work over the years – it is only because of you that I have built something I can live off of and now take with me into a new adventure. Please continue enjoying my work and letting others know about it! Much love!! 🌹

BUG STUFF ON SALE

nanonaturalist: Tank cleaning day for the fla…

nanonaturalist:

Tank cleaning day for the flannel baby! He’s probably busy molting right now (or asleep!). You can see the empty pupa from one of his unicorn prominent roommates in some of these. It’s the dark red-brown thing.

FYI: don’t do this at home. These caterpillars have such extremely painful stings that they recently made it into the news. No touching flannel babies!!!! Only touch adults!!!

Southern Flannel Moth caterpillar (Megalopyge opercularis)

July 21, 2018

A cocoon!!!

July 22, 2018

celestialmacros: Ok, I’ve always thought that…

celestialmacros:

Ok, I’ve always thought that clearwing moths were fairy-like, but this one seems to have actual magic in its wings.  I’ve been a photographer for a long, long time and I’ve never seen any kind of motion blur like this.  It has an aura.  Its a new camera and I could have had hit some weird buttons, but it only happened on these 4 frames.  Below is what these moths look like normally:

image

Snowberry Clearwing moth (Hemaris diffinis), July 16 and 20, 2018, Southeastern Pennsylvania

My babies are so wonderful 😭

Fun fact: their wings are not clear at all before they start flying. Here’s one who had just emerged from her pupa:

thelepidopteragirl: nanonaturalist: entophile…

thelepidopteragirl:

nanonaturalist:

entophiles:

Couple a cute moths I spotted today

(I know the left is a clymene moth but not sure of the right)

Right moth is a dagger

Random page of daggers from The New Moth Book (Peterson Field Guide to Moths of Southeastern North America) as examples.

ahhh that guide is out???? I’ve been waiting for it !!!!

Yeah, it just came a few months ago and it’s great! The range is somewhat limited BUT it has many (but not all) of the species you can expect to encounter in the American South. Very good for experts and noobs alike.

Tank cleaning day for the flannel baby! He’s p…

Tank cleaning day for the flannel baby! He’s probably busy molting right now (or asleep!). You can see the empty pupa from one of his unicorn prominent roommates in some of these. It’s the dark red-brown thing.

FYI: don’t do this at home. These caterpillars have such extremely painful stings that they recently made it into the news. No touching flannel babies!!!! Only touch adults!!!

Southern Flannel Moth caterpillar (Megalopyge opercularis)

July 21, 2018

entophiles: Couple a cute moths I spotted tod…

entophiles:

Couple a cute moths I spotted today

(I know the left is a clymene moth but not sure of the right)

Right moth is a dagger

Random page of daggers from The New Moth Book (Peterson Field Guide to Moths of Southeastern North America) as examples.

Couple a cute moths I spotted today (I know t…

Couple a cute moths I spotted today

(I know the left is a clymene moth but not sure of the right)

 @wildsageleon submitted:

 @wildsageleon submitted:

Do you know what kind of moth this is? The first picture is of its underside and the second is of the top

These little moths are tricky! The basic shape tells me this is a Geometrid moth (the caterpillars are commonly called “inchworms”). Worldwide, there are about 35,000 species of Geometrid moths [link], which is a lot of moths! And many of these can look so similar, the only way to distinguish them is by either dissecting them or looking at their privates through a microscope.

I tried using the identify tool on iNaturalist [link] (basically, add the photo and see what it thinks it is), and it guessed genus Pasiphila [link], which is within Geometridae. I don’t know where you are in the world, but if you are in North America, the only species in this genus is the Green Pug Moth Pasiphila rectangulata [link]

I compared your photo to one that has been identified on Bugguide [link], and they look pretty close!

The colors aren’t as bright in yours, but the placement of the markings is similar. There can be a lot of variation between individuals of the same species based on their age and their surroundings (and how they hold their wings!

July 20, 2018

patchesthecryptid: bugkeeping: about a month …

patchesthecryptid:

bugkeeping:

about a month ago these guys were the size of a grain of rice

@nanonaturalist @moth-mobile @salopian-peasant look at these adorable lads

*gently kisses each horn*

emptyinthesnow: nanonaturalist: Who wore it b…

emptyinthesnow:

nanonaturalist:

Who wore it better?

July 12, 2018

What the fuck is this is the fuck what

Babies! They grow up into:

Vine Sphinx moth 😍