Category: nature photography

dendroica: This post will collect my observati…

dendroica:

This post will collect my observations for the iNatters of tumblr project’s Scavenger Hunt. (For more, see this post by @pterygota)

An example of camouflage: Carolina Grasshopper

Something fuzzy: Delicate Cycnia caterpillar

Something spiky: Field Thistle

A symbiotic relationship: Common Greenshield Lichen

Something yellow and black: Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

Something brown and white: Common Buckeye

Something purple and green: New York Ironweed

Something really common in your area: Common Ragweed

Something not native to your area: Mile-a-minute Weed

A bee native to your area: Common Eastern Bumble Bee

A plant gall: Goldenrod Bunch Gall Midge

I will reblog with additions as I find more.

Excellent

September 1, 2019

Regular

mei-unicornio:

Cute! #butterfly #plants #nature #mariposa #lepidóptera

This looks like the same Gulf Fritillary butterflies we get up in North America! They range down into South America, too!

The caterpillars eat leaves from the passionvine. There are lots of varieties of this plant. Here are two in Texas:

Yellow Passionflower

Passiflora “incense” – I grow this vine in my garden and it takes over the entire back yard! The flowers are huge (see the spider in the right of the photo?) and hummingbirds will even come to feed at them.

August 15, 2019

Is it true that bees sometimes sleep on flower…

Is it true that bees sometimes sleep on flowers? I just read it on a post but I don't know if they were trying to make a cutesy #aesthetic post or if it was based on actual facts

Honeybees no, but other species of wild bees do, especially when it comes to male bees as they typically don’t nest like females. With some species like cuckoo bees being an exception as females have been seen sleeping on flowering plants. Species like bumblebees, long-horned bees, blue-banded bees are also known to sleep in or on flowers. 

But there’s about 20,000 species of bees and majority of them are solitary so I’d say roosting on flowers would be extremely common along most solitary bee species.

This is what it looks like when a bunch of male long-horned bees look like roosting:

I’m a finalist in a photography contest (???) …

I’m a finalist in a photography contest (???) with these two babes, winners will be in a calendar, and it’s making me think maybe I should make a caterpillar calendar of my own anyway.

Top: Vine Sphinx
Bottom: Tiger moth (unknown species)

August 15, 2019

Regular

nanonaturalist:

bogleech:

Almost all of human culture throughout history seems to regard birds and beautiful, majestic, respectable animals but have you actually met a bird??? Have you ever seen anything resembling dignity come out of those things???

Pictured above: Dignity escaping from birds in liquid form
Spotted Sandpiper, Texas (top) and Common Bulbul, Malawi (bottom)

August 13, 2019

@jabercoll, my friend, you forget the part where birds often poop… nonchalantly… on each other.

These Black Vultures?

They’re called Black Vultures for a reason. They are purely black. They have no white feathers.

Their poop, however, is white. They are highly social birds, they roost in large groups. And like birds are wont to do, they nonchalantly poop wherever they happen to be. Which is often directly above another bird. 

August 13, 2019

Regular

bogleech:

Almost all of human culture throughout history seems to regard birds and beautiful, majestic, respectable animals but have you actually met a bird??? Have you ever seen anything resembling dignity come out of those things???

Pictured above: Dignity escaping from birds in liquid form
Spotted Sandpiper, Texas (top) and Common Bulbul, Malawi (bottom)

August 13, 2019

universitybookstore: eye-popping and unexpect…

universitybookstore:

eye-popping and unexpected beauties! From Heyday and nature photographer and author Josie Iselin, The Curious World of Seaweed.

Another book I need, making me homesick

August 5(?), 2019

Florida Master Naturalist Program

Florida Master Naturalist Program:

pterygota:

hey hey can you all do me a favor and like this photo for a photo contest i entered??? thank you!!

Look at this superb owl!

July 22, 2019

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:We can’t always see the …

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

We can’t always see the flows around us, but that doesn’t mean they’re not there. Audobon Photography Award winner Kathrin Swaboda waited for a cold morning to catch this spectacular photo of a red-winged blackbird’s song. In the morning chill, moisture from the bird’s breath condensed inside the vortex rings it emitted, giving us a glimpse of its sound. (Image credit: K. Swaboda; via Gizmodo; submitted by Joseph S and Stuart H)

*faints*

Now that’s what I call nature photography

July 19, 2019

nanonaturalist: Oak galls in Travis Audubon’s…

nanonaturalist:

Oak galls in Travis Audubon’s Baker Sanctuary outside Austin, March 18, 2017. Galls are a new thing for me: they are growths composed of plant matter that grow around a larva, typically of a gall wasp. They do not harm the plant, and if you don’t know any better you would think they are dried berries or seeds.

This was my first time seeing fresh ones–before I had only seen the brown dried up ones the wasps had already emerged from (several are pictured above, look for the exit hole). The green galls seemed to be only on the saplings. I collected a couple to dissect at home (didn’t bring my knife!).

Turns out each gall has an individual wasp. The middle of the ball has a suspended encasement for the larva. You can see where the larva is in the photo of the dissected green gall–the larva is on the side I’m pointing to with a needle. I pulled out my trusty iPhone microscope, and amazingly was able to get (very shaky) video of the larva MOVING. Creeped me the hell out when I saw it.

Fun fact: when I first saw the wasp larva moving in the microscope, I actually screamed 👍

Amphibolips sp. – Wasp that produces galls on oak trees

Reposted July 14, 2019