Category: night

mei-unicornio:

Cute! #butterfly #plants #nature #mariposa #lepidóptera

This looks like the same Gulf Fritillary butterflies we get up in North America! They range down into South America, too!

The caterpillars eat leaves from the passionvine. There are lots of varieties of this plant. Here are two in Texas:

Yellow Passionflower

Passiflora “incense” – I grow this vine in my garden and it takes over the entire back yard! The flowers are huge (see the spider in the right of the photo?) and hummingbirds will even come to feed at them.

August 15, 2019

Is it true that bees sometimes sleep on flowers? I just read it on a post but I don't know if they were trying to make a cutesy #aesthetic post or if it was based on actual facts

Honeybees no, but other species of wild bees do, especially when it comes to male bees as they typically don’t nest like females. With some species like cuckoo bees being an exception as females have been seen sleeping on flowering plants. Species like bumblebees, long-horned bees, blue-banded bees are also known to sleep in or on flowers. 

But there’s about 20,000 species of bees and majority of them are solitary so I’d say roosting on flowers would be extremely common along most solitary bee species.

This is what it looks like when a bunch of male long-horned bees look like roosting:

nanonaturalist:

Was visited by a dobsonfly tonight. My first!!! I was so excited! My backyard has the best bugs

May 19, 2017

A beautiful lady! I had another one visit me this year as well. I am so blessed.

Reposted July 16, 2019

nanonaturalist:

What can I say? Bugs just find me attractive.

Life hack: wear a headlamp out in the country at night, and you too can have giant beetles flying at your face.

May 17, 2017

Hardwood Stump Borer, Mallodon dasystomus, who loved me (or at least my lämp)

Reposted July 16, 2019

entomologyfrassposting:

June beetles be like:

Tonight, I watched a May beetle chase off this wolf spider:

I didn’t manage photos, because as the beetle walked into the arms of this spider, the spider did a combo ice-skate/teleport out of Texas (and possibly the galaxy) in absolute terror.

Spider is a Rabid Wolf Spider (Rabidosa rabida), and very large. Five times the size of the beetle, at least. To be fair, her mouth was full.

July 14, 2019

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Eastern Pondhawk

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Thornbush Dasher

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Blue Dasher (male)

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Blue Dasher (male)

I saw six individuals in the yard while out getting bug food. A female Blue Dasher was too far back in the bushes to get. Usually I don’t notice the dragonflies until I wake them up and they fly at my headlamp. Here was one of them on my nose last week:

Sorry, terrible photo. Had caterpillars in my free hand (couldn’t remove the headlamp), so it was the best I could do!

July 9, 2019 3 am / posted July 10, 2019

Baby anoles are here!

Every year, my yard fills up with green anoles, doing pushups, unfurling their red neck-flaps, and snoozing in the trees and bushes at night. My yard may as well be a Green Anole Breeding Facility with how many I get every year.

Here’s a tiny baby from last night 🙂

June 26, 2019

nanonaturalist:

caterpillar-gifs:

Ruddy Dagger Moth caterpillar, extra twitchy

I didn’t realize until I came back inside and looked over the photos, but twitchy baby was molting!

I think this is the first time I’ve found one of these caterpillars in my yard! Nice!

June 3, 2019

I couldn’t help myself. The next night I went back.

I adopted the baby (can you find his sister in the photo? She’s camouflaged!)

Since I don’t know how these moths pupate, I tried to look it up. Note keyword “tried.” The closest I got was a note about another species digging a burrow in the cedar siding on a house and making a cocoon there. Some moths prefer to pupate underground, and some of the furry moths are content to make cocoons wherever. So I gave the baby options!

This is the enclosure set-up I have. It’s an aquarium on its side with fine-weave mesh fabric held in place over the opening with a tight elastic loop. Very inexpensive! Paper towel on the bottom. Small critter carrier with peat moss inside, and the water-filled pill bottle (topped with press-n-seal) holding the hackberry branch is in there so he could climb down and burrow.

Behind the pill bottle in the dirt-filled critter carrier is a small piece of pine bark. It’s not really visible. In case the baby goes wandering, or it’s not big enough, I put a much larger piece of pine bark next to the carrier.

I hope he likes it!

June 5, 2019

nanonaturalist:

TIME TO SCREAM

Late spring in central Texas, nice and warm, not quite hot enough to melt your shoes, but hot enough to melt everything in your car.

But it’s not summer until…

the trees start screaming!

I have heard some cicadas farther east of me (a different species than I have), but so far, this year has been quiet. So I feel like I have been visited by the Cicada Queen, who has bestowed upon me a great honor: I saw my first cicada before I heard it. She was hiding in the elm that popped up in my yard!

So beautiful and perfect!!!

Superb Dog-day Cicada

June 3, 2019

@thedaeyoung This species is green! When they have just emerged, they look like a blue-green ghost! I found one (a different species, but same genus) last year [link]:

June 4, 2019

TIME TO SCREAM

Late spring in central Texas, nice and warm, not quite hot enough to melt your shoes, but hot enough to melt everything in your car.

But it’s not summer until…

the trees start screaming!

I have heard some cicadas farther east of me (a different species than I have), but so far, this year has been quiet. So I feel like I have been visited by the Cicada Queen, who has bestowed upon me a great honor: I saw my first cicada before I heard it. She was hiding in the elm that popped up in my yard!

So beautiful and perfect!!!

Superb Dog-day Cicada

June 3, 2019