Category: not mine

Regular

bunjywunjy:

Target continues to be my remorseless enabler. also, I probably freaked some people out because I cackled loudly in the dressing room the whole time I was trying this thing on

*GASP*

Last time I raided the kid’s department at Target, I got these sweet shark shirts (I don’t remember if I saw the button-up or not—if I did it was too expensive!):

The tooth one glows in the dark! I’m still a huge fan of my gateway shirt into the children’s clothing department:

Front and back, shiny silvery letters containing an animal fact, anatomically correct representations of sharks with their names (again, shiny silvery letters), and in the little girl’s section. The sharks are CUTE!!! Just like they are in REAL LIFE!!! I want to kiss all their little noses!!!

Anyways yeah I also have an addiction. I think the Target people figured out they have two key customer bases. They just need to start making the same shirts in adult sizes! I’m lucky I’m relatively small and can squeeze into the kid’s shirts, everyone else deserves them, too! Maybe we should start a petition.

April 19, 2019

Regular

six-legs-and-more:

the-study-of-arachnology-comic:

six-legs-and-more:

nanonaturalist:

six-legs-and-more:

six-legs-and-more:

entomologyfrassposting:

six-legs-and-more:

six-legs-and-more:

I just found what I think is a dying great diving beetle in the middle of campus for some reason so I brought it back to my dorm and stuck it in my freezer

I’m gonna try to pin it but I have never pinned an insect before so this is not going to be pretty 

but I gotta learn somehow 

Yeah broke sound about right I just tore apart an old slipper for the foam sole

This is gonna be great

Pinning is the best! Here’s the best spot to pin a beetle in just in case you didn’t know. A little tip I wish I knew when doing beetles, especially large ones, be careful where you pin in relation to the oegs because you could accidentally take a leg off when the pin goes through

Thank you so much you all are saving my life. As a little update the beetle, besides a bit of guts coming out from the bottom of it, was in pretty good condition: wings and legs and head nicely intact. I put it in a cutout bottom of a plastic cup legs down but now the beetle is frozen to the bottom of the cup by its guts. Marvel at my professional 12am handiwork. I should have froze it upside down. Ahh the things we learn through trial and error.

I’ll have a look. I can already hear the distant screams of those who have done this for years as I eventually subject them to watching me destroy this poor bug.

This site (Purdue Entomology [link]) has some great info and tips for pinning and displaying all sorts of insects (use the table of contents over to the left of the page to navigate). When you start pinning with labels, there is a special pinning block with various heights that allows you to have the labels all exactly the right distance apart so you can read all the info from the drawer.

April 8, 2019

You know I’ve been joking around a lot but I really do mean it when I say that the bug side of tumblr is my favorite part of tumblr. Everyone has been so helpful, maybe it won’t turn out as bad as I think. Thank you!!!

Now im kinda curious…. could you pin a weevil or are thwy simply too small?

According to that site @nanonaturalist gave above, you can pin small insects, but you have to attach them to a card and then pin the card

ANOTHER ALTERNATIVE! You can buy those empty pill capsules, put your small insect in them, and then pin through the capsule. Bioquip sells the caps [link], but you can also buy them from the pharmacy for pretty cheap. 

I use them to store my tiny caterpillar head capsules (when I don’t have them just laying around in a jar lid somewhere ugh).

If you use these things, make sure YOU DON’T GET THEM WET!!!!!! (they dissolve!!)

April 18, 2019

Do you ever pin any of your bugs after they di…

Do you ever pin any of your bugs after they die? Like to use to educate people? Or is it too emotional for you after their passing?

I try to pin and frame as many as I’m able! It’s part of continuing to enjoy such short lived buggos. It always sucks to lose insects you’ve worked so carefully raising and watching, no matter how long you’ve had them, but it happens 😢 (hell, it’s why most insects/spiders lay hundreds of eggs, stuff happens and that gives them a better survival chance). The two tarantulas here are Doc (P. cancerides) and Creamsicle (P. murinus). Doc was, unfortunately, a mature male, and Creamsicle had a bad molt.

Grog (D. tityus, beetle) and Anne (P. regalis) have been pinned for quite a while waiting on frames. Eastern Hercules Beetles dont live very long once maturing and Anne was a very old mature male pokie.

Sometimes, due to a bad molt (or my general ignorance for how to go about it with a particular critter), the bugs or spiders aren’t able to be pinned, but I still keep them in my sealed, padded display.

I also have friends who bring me dead insects/spiders, sometimes, too. Sometimes they’re a bit chewed on by clean up crews or fungi, so I disinfect them and place them in my frame for later.

Do you ever pin any of your bugs after they di…

Do you ever pin any of your bugs after they die? Like to use to educate people? Or is it too emotional for you after their passing?

I try to pin and frame as many as I’m able! It’s part of continuing to enjoy such short lived buggos. It always sucks to lose insects you’ve worked so carefully raising and watching, no matter how long you’ve had them, but it happens 😢 (hell, it’s why most insects/spiders lay hundreds of eggs, stuff happens and that gives them a better survival chance). The two tarantulas here are Doc (P. cancerides) and Creamsicle (P. murinus). Doc was, unfortunately, a mature male, and Creamsicle had a bad molt.

Grog (D. tityus, beetle) and Anne (P. regalis) have been pinned for quite a while waiting on frames. Eastern Hercules Beetles dont live very long once maturing and Anne was a very old mature male pokie.

Sometimes, due to a bad molt (or my general ignorance for how to go about it with a particular critter), the bugs or spiders aren’t able to be pinned, but I still keep them in my sealed, padded display.

I also have friends who bring me dead insects/spiders, sometimes, too. Sometimes they’re a bit chewed on by clean up crews or fungi, so I disinfect them and place them in my frame for later.

Everything is on Fire

myfrogcroaked:

I know a lot of you are really upset about the Notre Dame fire in Paris, and I’m really sad too. To see something so beautiful and so carefully constructed be damaged by forces out of your control is very painful. As a scientist who studies species that are going extinct right now, this is a feeling I grapple with more often than I’d like. The irreplaceable work of art that I worship is nature, and to watch it senselessly crumble to the ground every day hurts my heart. I highly respect your feelings about what happened today, and I hope the parallel I described can help you better understand how many of the people who have devoted their lives to conservation feel quite often. We know you get tired of us shouting about species going extinct, and we’re sorry for the broken record, but we’re surrounded by burning cathedrals built across millennia.

How do you feel?

https://www.facebook.com/jonathan.kolby.1/posts/10156332034161139

I felt the same exact way. This week has been terrible–on Saturday, a tornado tore through the Caddo Mounds State Historic Site [link], which is an archeological site in east Texas where a Native American tribe had once lived. The historic site was also home to a newly-built (2015) museum, and Saturday was Caddo Culture Day, a festival celebrating the native heritage of the area. As the storm approached, the 100 or so attendees took shelter in the museum, which the tornado hit, tearing off the roof and collapsing in the walls [link]. This isn’t in the news article I linked to, but because of the storm, it took first responders two hours to arrive. Two of the event volunteers were Master Naturalists, one of whom was a practicing medical doctor, the other was trained in wilderness first-aid, and despite their own serious injuries, they tended to the care of others until the helicopters could arrive. 

Thing is, we can rebuild museums. We can rebuild the Notre Dame’s spire. We can look at photos of the original. The stone structure remains. Not all of the interior of the cathedral was destroyed. The holy relics were saved.

We can’t rebuild species. We can’t run in and save them after we’ve culled the species diversity down past a certain point. There are species we don’t even know ever existed that we have already pushed to extinction, and we will never know how important they were. There are species we didn’t discover until they were already extinct. There are species, right now, that we know are facing extinction, but we can’t get the government to agree, and they refuse to ban the pesticides that are killing them, and we just have to sit back and watch them all die.

I heard Alex Wild say that being an entomologist right now is like being an art historian in a world where a museum burns to the ground every week.

Well, what happens when the museums start burning every week, too? What kind of world is that? The worst part, I know there are plenty of people who don’t care about either.

April 15, 2019

mikelikesscience: Computer Science Is A Lot!I…

mikelikesscience:

Computer Science Is A Lot!

In case you didn’t know, I went back to college for a Master’s in Computer Science. My original degree is Fine Arts. 

But before I can start the Master’s Program, I have to do a bunch of Math and Computer Science Undergrad courses. Calculus, Data Structures, Object Oriented Programming, and so on.

How hard could it be? I’ve made so many Science Raps and watched so many Education Channels–it should be a piece of Cake!

OMG. I was so wrong! Studying Computer Science is so difficult! For me it was not Cake. It was more like Brussels Sprouts.

And just like my experience with vegetables, the discipline for Computer Science is an acquired taste. I had to dedicate a lot of time to studying and doing homework. I got help from tutors, mentors, peers, and professors. I had to make a lot of mistakes in order to succeed.

Now I’m about ¾ of the way done with the Undergrad requirements. I’ll be starting the Master’s Program in the fall!

So if you were wondering what the context and inspiration for my latest video was–now you know!

Hi Mike! I was in your shoes, too! I had a BA in Psychology, but it was really hard to keep finding contracts at Microsoft during the recession (I graduated in 2005) when I was competing with people who had computer science degrees and way more experience.

So I went back for a BS in engineering (I studied chemical) and eventually continued on to a masters in biomedical engineering. But that first term back in school, I had to retake Calculus I, since the last time I took it had been 10 years ago—it had been so long since I had taken a math class that I had to relearn algebra at the same time!

This stuff is HARD, and it’s important for people considering STEM majors to know that if they are struggling, it’s not just them! So thank you for posting this! Before I graduated, one of my undergraduate professors would half jokingly introduce me as the best student in the department, and I often felt like a total idiot in some of my classes.

It’s rare for scientists and engineers to also be effective science communicators, so I’m looking forward to seeing what direction you take as your education progresses!

April 14, 2019

Regular

lwhittie:

Hey all! I have a new place to sell prints of my illustrations on Inprnt.

Come check it out here:

https://www.inprnt.com/gallery/lwhittierillustration/

YES

April 12, 2019

A Rare Bald Eagle Trio—Two Dads and a Mom—Capt…

A Rare Bald Eagle Trio—Two Dads and a Mom—Captivates Webcam Fans:

eartharchives:

In a tall tree situated on the Mississippi River in Fulton, Illinois, three eagles, a female and two males, are looking after three downy eaglets.

I LOVE THESE EAGLES

April 12, 2019

Regular

botanyshitposts:

lads. i have 3 brain cells 

i think i have shin splints

from going on a long walk multiple days in a row with 20 pounds of cassava books in my backpack

I have about the same number of brain cells and I read 20 lbs of cassava roots in your backpack and thought you were like, a method research-paper writer.

April 11, 2019

I,,, misread nepenthens for isoetes on the las…

I,,, misread nepenthens for isoetes on the last post somehow and i felt,,,, f,,,fear,,,,

fun fact there’s literally no books out there showcasing all the species of isoetes in the world like u might find for other plants. if u want to know that information u gotta go digging through 89 levels of deep academia and only then may you possibly stumble upon a hit list of names. 

when i was researching for my term paper on them last semester i tried to build a distribution map of all the species, but the only book i could find was a weird old cloth-bound codex (literally a codex) that i had to specially request from my uni’s library storage building. after i got it i realized that 1. it…really was just deadass a list of names and ranges, 2. it was nowhere close to the exact ranges and just gave vague outdated country information with weirdly ambiguous sources, and 3. it was nowhere close to all the species known to us. the actual age of the book was hard to pin down; i want to say that it was 1970s, but it felt…….older somehow. it had quite The Energy and i quickly returned it 

im sure that if u were to dig through some databases, you’d be able to find a more comprehensive list– i accidentally stumbled on a comprehensive checklist of all the hornworts in the world published by phytokeys, for instance, and hornworts are kind of in the same category of ‘weird niche nonvascular plants one might glimpse for 3 seconds while hiking like bigfoot amongst the trees’– but man, why cant we just have a nice comprehensive coffee table isoetes book? 

this is off topic now but i keep reading these researchers in both isoetes and hornwort papers talking about how one of the biggest challenges to new research is that nobody knows jack shit about them, and i cant help but think like….comprehensive, readable knowledge of these plants is near impossible to find? like, most of the modern papers i was reading for isoetes kept shying away from discussing the fucked up anatomy of those plants to the point where the only book i was able to find that laid it all out for the reader in a semi-understandable format was a book from the late 1960s buried in the fern section of our library? all the illustrations in it were hand drawn? i still havent been able to find a good photo of some of these structures? i got a couple high resolution scans of some of the samples from my uni’s herbarium to publish on this blog, and had people literally come thank me because pics of specimens cut open to show the actual anatomy are hard as shit to find? like? 

this turned into a little bit of a rant but come on lads!!! to get to know these plants u gotta go through like 93 levels of academia and know like 6 people!!! it’s no wonder why nobody knows them well!!!