Category: reblogs

platycryptus:

some authentic bumblebee sex for all you beefuckers out there

Glumshoe my Polyphemus silk moth jk just emerged and it's September! Should I release her now?

Oh hmmm… did you keep her indoors/near incandescent light? If they get too much unnatural light cycle, they’ll eclose from their cocoons early and not overwinter. I’m not sure where you live, but here it’s too late in the season for a new generation. You might have some luck keeping her in a wide-meshed enclosure outside at night, where any male moths still hanging around might find her… but I’m concerned that even if she laid eggs, there won’t be leaves on the trees long enough for the larvae to grow to pupation and overwinter.

So. Up to you. If you want to try for the slim chance of another generation, go for it… or release her and she may either get lucky on her own or serve as a meal for a hungry owl or bat or something.

A few years ago my mother tried raising luna moths but didn’t know about the light and temperature cycle, so she kept their cocoons indoors over the winter where they stayed warm and were exposed to incandescent light. They ended up eclosing just before Christmas—there was nowhere for them to go, so we just had ~20 giant green moths fluttering around loose inside our house for a week before they died.

heya, i just wanted to ask how and where you get most of your info on arthropods/other "weird" critters. i wanna learn more about them, but idk where to start

Info on wikipedia is actually pretty great for that, people do add almost every known fact to most pages, although for more obscure species you have to dig to find much more.

Some great online blogs (some still updating, some not but with big archives!) include:

Gwen Pearson (Bug Girl) on Wired

Catalogue of Organisms

Myrmecos (also a nature photography blog, and has special focus on ants)

Fly obsession – just flies!

glumshoe:

I’m going to cry, I want one so badly…

thistlebackedwulver:

@glumshoe Big Ol Plush Velvet Worms!

spirellity:

They are back in their full wormyness! Velvet Worms!

get them in my shop spirellity.com

Same

Saw a reddit thread with someone complaining that a fish they saw at a farmer's market had one of those tongue replacing parasites in its mouth. I found myself wishing for a moment that I had a reddit account just so I could comment "It's not a bug, it's a feature!"

Yeah it’s literally a crustacean so if you cooked them together you get a free shrimp. Or, more importantly, a free specimen. I would pay good money for a tongue louse in a jar :0

Saw a reddit thread with someone complaining that a fish they saw at a farmer's market had one of those tongue replacing parasites in its mouth. I found myself wishing for a moment that I had a reddit account just so I could comment "It's not a bug, it's a feature!"

Yeah it’s literally a crustacean so if you cooked them together you get a free shrimp. Or, more importantly, a free specimen. I would pay good money for a tongue louse in a jar :0

skelebee:

inspired by nanonaturalist’s post [X]

This is the best thing ever and I love it with my whole caterpillar-filled heart.

August 16, 2019

saturniidays:

image

Okay so let me tell you a story about this friendly dude I’m calling Nate (get it cause Nature? Anyways) I spotted this beautiful banded buggo, this absolute unit. I wanted nothing more than to pick Nate up and just, get some candid shots or something. A tiny voice of reason told me to share an image first, just to be safe. After all, I’m no professional, friend. Let me tell you, I sent this image to another good bug friend who informed me that this pal, This beautiful, wonderful chunky boo, shoots practically “molten” butt goo from his butt for lack of correct terminology. I was spared the heartache of potentially a week of blindness.

I don’t know exactly where I’m going with this aside from, had I not looked into this guy first, I’d be blinded by now. Aside from that shock, I still love that buggo and it only seemed natural to share my friend Ma’am/Sir Molten Lava Butt Goo with you, maybe you could use this as a teaching moment or something!

As I always say when bugging you (pun graciously intended) I hope you’re having a wonderful day! 

—-

Oh woah what a funky little guy I love him!!!! Did your friend say what he is? I’ve never seen one of these before and he looks very interesting

Genus Anisomorpha [link to bugguide] contains stick insects that can spray a chemical deterrant that can damage eyes. Interesting to note: this is the only one I’ve seen that wasn’t mating! They almost always seem to come in pairs. This would be a lady based on size.

I think you need to harass them quite a bit to get them to spray, but of course, better safe than sorry!

August 16, 2019

mei-unicornio:

Cute! #butterfly #plants #nature #mariposa #lepidóptera

This looks like the same Gulf Fritillary butterflies we get up in North America! They range down into South America, too!

The caterpillars eat leaves from the passionvine. There are lots of varieties of this plant. Here are two in Texas:

Yellow Passionflower

Passiflora “incense” – I grow this vine in my garden and it takes over the entire back yard! The flowers are huge (see the spider in the right of the photo?) and hummingbirds will even come to feed at them.

August 15, 2019

Is it true that bees sometimes sleep on flowers? I just read it on a post but I don't know if they were trying to make a cutesy #aesthetic post or if it was based on actual facts

Honeybees no, but other species of wild bees do, especially when it comes to male bees as they typically don’t nest like females. With some species like cuckoo bees being an exception as females have been seen sleeping on flowering plants. Species like bumblebees, long-horned bees, blue-banded bees are also known to sleep in or on flowers. 

But there’s about 20,000 species of bees and majority of them are solitary so I’d say roosting on flowers would be extremely common along most solitary bee species.

This is what it looks like when a bunch of male long-horned bees look like roosting: